Let’s talk about The Hibiscus House Bed & Breakfast in Fort Myers, Florida. Do you know the old property cliché? “Location, location, location!” Well, this bed and breakfast’s location is fantastic! Full disclosure, I may be a little partial because my big brother owns the Hibiscus House. But in all honesty, its location really is situated superbly in sunny southwest Florida.

Location…

Needless to say, the Sunshine State’s weather is remarkable. The city of Fort Myers has average high and low temperatures of 85 and 65 degrees respectively. Does it get any better than that? Consider the fact that Florida is also the flattest state in the country and its walkable and bikeable score is sky-high, pun intended. Even casual participants in outdoor activities find hiking and biking more enjoyable.

Location…

The Hibiscus House’s proximity and equal distance to both the River District and the extremely popular, historical destination of the Edison and Ford Winter Estates are worth noting. The River District is absolutely my favorite place in Fort Myers for far too many reasons to list. There is always something to experience and explore. Early 20th century buildings still stand amidst the 21st-century revival of this town where restaurants, shops, art, and entertainment are in abundance. But for all its hub-bub, it’s not overwhelming. The River District seems completely welcoming and do-able. Check out myriverdistrict.com for the latest news and events.

Head back past the Hibiscus House down McGregor Blvd toward the Edison and Ford Winter Estates and see why Fort Myers is known as the City of Palms. We’ve all seen pictures of the palm trees on Canon Drive in Beverly Hills. Well, Fort Myers has its own picturesque landscape compliments of Thomas Edison himself. He was the driving force behind positioning the Royal Palms lining the street. Step out of the Hibiscus Houses Bed and Breakfast and you’ll be on the front of a postcard. The Edison and Ford Winter Estates include the historic homes, gardens, laboratory, and museum of Thomas Edison and Henry Ford, both of whom had vacation homes situated along the Caloosahatchee River.

Location…

You can’t go to Florida without going to the beach, I mean you can but who would want to? Fort Myers Beach and Sanibel Island are a 30-minute drive from the Hibiscus House. Both are some of the cleanest and most beautiful coastlines in the country.

If you’re on a quest for something other than catching some rays, head over to Fort Myers Beach on Estero Island. It parallels Estero Boulevard where shops, restaurants, bars, and activities are well supplied. On Fort Myers Beach there are more places to go and things to do when not in the surf. Definitely stop by the Dixie Fish Company, whose history dates back to the 1930s. Fantastic southern-style seafood prepared for you in a former open-air fish market is nothing to miss.

If a quieter, more nature-oriented coastline is your style, then Sanibel is the destination for you! We’ve vacationed on Sanibel numerous times and it’s lovely. The island is uniquely situated perpendicular in the Gulf allowing shells to wash up much easier. You’ll see everyone doing the “Sanibel Stoop.”

Most of the beach is private access for residents and renters, but don’t’ let that deter you. There are multiple public beach access areas. I recommend Lighthouse Beach and Bowman’s Beach, they have plenty of parking for a $5 per hour fee, restrooms, outside showers to rinse the sand away, picnic areas, charcoal grills, and walking trails. Bowman’s Beach Park also has a playground for the little ones, but keep in mind that the walk from parking to Bowman’s Beach is about .2 miles so if you have someone who isn’t as mobile, stick with Lighthouse Beach.

If the deeper purpose of your travel is relaxation; if it doesn’t include outdoor activities, downtown life or the beach, I still encourage you to check out the Hibiscus House Bed and Breakfast.

Sitting in the oversized chair in the front room with sunshine pouring in through the windows while reading a book is just about perfection.

Alan Ohara